Monday, 31 August 2015

Revolution, by Russell Brand




I honestly did not buy this book. My parents gave it to me last Christmas as an ironic present.

I've had a pretty low opinion of Russell Brand, his antics and his half thought out opinions, but reading this book gave me a lot more respect for the man. The book is well written and very witty, if at times a bit vulgar. Brand rejects the materialism of a lot of the young people today and acknowledges the need for spirituality. He talks a lot about God and even has a chapter on the Lord's Prayer. His theology is far from Christian, but it's better than the crass thoughtless atheism that is all too common. He also draws much from the experiences of his recovery from drug addiction, which I can relate to as somebody who works with drug users.

Nevertheless, despite my new appreciation of the man, I was hardly impressed by the political thoughts of Russell Brand. The impression I get is that he's a lazy thinker, who is happy to parrot Noam Chomsky without making any real effort to undestand economics and politics in any objective way. He describes various politicsl and economic solutions, without asking any hard questions about how possible problems they would encounter. He seriously thinks that organic farming is a solution to world hunger, despite the fact that organic farming produces smaller harvests.

Brand shows himself to be an illogical thinker. In one telling moment, he states that anyone who opposes his idea of revolution must therefore think the current political and economic system is the best possible one. This is not true at all. There are two other positions such a person could take. One could hold that the system we have is better than other alternative systems, even if not ideal. Or one could hold that the human cost of a revolution would be so high that it could not be justified.

Brand images that when his revolution happens, it will be a peaceful revolution and not the violent revolutions that he dislikes. But why should this be so? It's difficult to find historical examples of the kind of revolution that Brand would like. He seems to like Anarchism in Spain, but that did not last long enough for us to evaluate it as a long term model. The revolutions in Eastern Europe that ended Communism were mostly bloodless, but they resulted in capitalist institutions taking shape, so they are not much help to Brand.

This is an enjoyable read and reveals a man who is generally quite decent in sentiment, but sadly very shallow.

The Feast of Saint Joseph of Arimathea and Saint Nicodemus

O God, by whose grace
Saint Joseph of Arimathea
was emboldened to ask
for the sacred Body of our Lord Jesus Christ,
that together with Saint Nicodemus
he might prepare it for burial and lay it in his own tomb,
give us such an increase of faith and courage
that we may not fear to bear reproach for the sake of Christ,
but rather may serve Him with sincere devotion
all the days of our life.
Through the same our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
God, forever and ever.


Saint Joseph and Saint Nicodemus, pray for us and for the Jewish people.

Saturday, 29 August 2015

Maybe not so Ultraconservative?

I decided to remove the description of myself as 'Ultraconservative' from my profile as it seemed to have caused some confusion.

An American blog expressed bemusement that an Ultraconservative would support Jeb Bush. I think my choice of the word Ultraconservative was more in reference to my theology, which I think is very much on the conservative side of Catholicism and still owes a fair amount of affinity to my Evangelical background.

I would like to think I'm Ultraconservative politically; the sort of person who defends Pinochet and Franco and thinks Mussolini had a few good ideas up his sleeve, but I tend to find myself drifting towards the moderate side of Conservatism. I'm very much a wet Tory. I'm uncomfortable with radical welfare reform, I don't like the idea of scrapping the Human Rights Act and I'm very much a liberal on immigration. I personally don't see the EU and immigration as Left/Right issues, but most conservatives seem to think that being liberal on those issues makes one a bit less Right-wing.

I suppose calling myself 'Ultraconservative' might give people the wrong idea about my theology too. People could think I'm one of those Radical Catholic Traditionalists who reject Vatican II and think the Holy Father ia an heretic. So for now, I'l just be an orthodox Roman Catholic and a Conservative Party member (if a moderate one).

The Christian Journey: Head Covering A Symbol To The Unseen Realm

The Christian Journey: Head Covering A Symbol To The Unseen Realm

This passage in Corinthians clearly teaches of headship, where God is the head of Christ and Christ is the head of man and man is the head of woman. Though Biblical submission is right, women are not inferior spiritually but are one in Christ. Yet they must choose to submit and humble themselves, just as Christ humbled himself before the Father.

God’s government and way of order is done in such a way, where each member must do his or her part. When women or men choose not to fulfill and walk in God’s ways for the Church, disorder and every evil practice ensues. The importance of head covering is not for an outward showing but it is a spiritual reality proclaimed to the principalities and powers. When head covering is practiced, it proclaims God’s order and way to all of creation, including the angels (1 Peter 1:12).

Daily Telegraph: Assisted dying is slowly turning into a fashionable, liberal cause

Daily Telegraph: Assisted dying is slowly turning into a fashionable, liberal cause

Article by Tim Stanley


The second scenario is alluded to in the GPs letter. A woman is told her cancer is getting worse and she might have months to live. Her family are financially overstretched. They’ve never been very fond of her. They are told that they could make adjustments to their house at great expense to keep her at home or they could put her in social care, where they likely won’t visit. The patient is scared. She doesn’t want to be any problem for her family. When she tries to raise the subject they give answers that seem like placating: “Of course we love you. Of course we’ll look after you.” She concludes that she can’t trust her family or else she doesn’t want her last months to be spent living with guilt at having cost them money. So she chooses to die.

This scenario reminds us of something libertarians too often forget: people do not make choices in isolation. That’s not how real human beings work. Their decisions are shaped by their material circumstances and by the attitudes of those around them. Finally, they are shaped by culture.

A Biblical Defense of Catholicism, by Dave Armstrong




Protestants often consider themselves to be true 'Bible Christians.' The assumption is that the Bible supports their own positions and the Catholic can only rely on unbiblical traditions. In this book, Catholic apologist Dave Armstrong challenges this assumption by unveiling and marshaling the Scriptural support for Catholic doctrines. Armstrong expertly presents the Biblical case for such doctrines as the Eucharist, purgatory, the Papacy and other Catholic distinctives.

In the introduction, Armstrong makes clear that it is necessary to understand the Doctrine of Development in order to appreciate Catholic theology. Our theology did not fall down from heaven, but underwent development through theological reflection. We should not expect to find a fully developed Mariology in the New Testament, but we find the seeds from which our Catholic Mariology came. Protestants ought to understand this, as there is nobody prior to the 16th century who believed exactly what the Reformers believed.

I have said in previous posts that I would love to see a Catholic version of Wayne Grudem's Systematic Theology and I have yet to see a book that functions in a similar way. A Biblical Defense of Catholicism comes close. Although it only deals with those doctrines that are held by Catholics against Protestants, it has a comparable level of depth and technicality, as well as ease of reading. I particularly liked the table that Armstrong provided in the chapter on the Eucharist, in which he compares Transubstantiation with such phenomena as the conversion of water to ice and the digestion of food.

Many of Dave Armstrong's books are self-published, however, this title is published by Sophia Press and is very handsomely bound and produced. This will book would be of great value to Protestants wanting to know how Catholics justify their beliefs and to Catholics who want to explore the Biblical foundations of their faith.

Catholic Herald: British Catholics must resist the nationalist temptation

Catholic Herald: British Catholics must resist the nationalist temptation

Article by Father Alexander Lucie-Smith


'So why on earth vote to stay in? The answer is because I am a Catholic and, as such, an internationalist. The single greatest threat to world peace is nationalism. Serb nationalism and Russian nationalism between them have given us a series of wars in in Europe in the last two decades.

Coupled with this is the threat of religious sectarianism, with which, Catholicism, properly understood, must always find itself at variance. The EU, defective as it is, does represent an attempt to overcome nationalism. The idea of Germany invading Poland would nowadays seem unthinkable.

A strong EU – and without Britain, the EU would be weaker – is a guarantee of safety to its more vulnerable members such as Poland and Lithuania. British readers hardly need reminding that these were two countries that we failed back in 1939, and we must never do that again. The European ideal leaves me a little cold, in its present incarnation, especially given the follies of the EU – I have not forgotten the Rocco Buttiglione affair. But for the sake of the new democracies of the East, we should vote to stay in.'



Absolutely right, Father. As I have said before, I just don't get how Catholics can support UKIP. UKIP seems completely antithetical to a Catholic outlook. A century ago, the people who rage against the European Union would be raging against Popery.

Friday, 28 August 2015

The Feast of Saint Augustine

Renew in your Church, we pray, O Lord, that spirit with which you endowed your Bishop Saint Augustine that, filled with the same spirit, we may thirst for you, the sole fount of true wisdom, and seek you, the author of heavenly love. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Litany in honour of Saint Augustine


Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.

Lord, have mercy on us. Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.

God the Father of Heaven,
Have mercy on us.

God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
Have mercy on us.

God the Holy Ghost,
Have mercy on us.

Holy Trinity, One God,
Have mercy on us.

Holy Mary,
pray for us.

Holy Mother of God,
pray for us.

Holy Virgin of virgins,
pray for us.

Holy Father Augustine,
pray for us.

Saint Augustine, example of contrite souls,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, son of the tears of thy mother Monica,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, light of teachers,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, exterminator of heresies,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, illustrious warrior against the foes of the Church,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, pillar of the True Faith,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, vessel of Divine Wisdom,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, rule of conduct for apostolic life,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, whose heart was inflamed with the fire of Divine Love,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, humble and merciful father,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, zealous preacher of the Word of God,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, illumined expounder of Sacred Scripture,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, ornament of bishops,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, light of the True Faith,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, noble defender of Holy Church,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, refulgence of the glory of God,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, blossoming olive tree of the House of God,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, indefatigable adorer of the Most Holy Trinity,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, inexhaustible fountain of Christian eloquence,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, shining mirror of holiness,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, model of all virtues,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, consoler of the distressed,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, comforter of the forsaken,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, friend and helper of the poor,
pray for us.

St. Augustine, our father,
pray for us.

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Spare us, O Lord.

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Graciously hear us, O Lord.

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Have mercy on us, O Lord.

Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.

Let Us Pray

O God, Who didst disclose to Saint Augustine
the hidden mysteries of Thy wisdom
and didst enkindle in his heart
the flame of Divine Love,
thus renewing in Thy Church
the pillar of cloud and fire,
graciously grant that we may pass safely
through the storms of this world
and reach the eternal fatherland
which Thou didst promise us,
through Christ Our Lord.

Amen



Saint Augustine, pray for us and for all theologians.

Thursday, 27 August 2015

St. Joseph's Vanguard: Every English Mass Should Be Like the Anglican Ordinariate’s

St. Joseph's Vanguard: Every English Mass Should Be Like the Anglican Ordinariate’s


'We should have had five hundred years of English Catholic music, culture, and life, but instead Catholics were hunted down and killed and the Church went underground there for a long time.

So Pope Emeritus Benedict showed great wisdom and brilliance in establishing the Anglican Ordinariate. He realized what we had lost, and he saw a way to retrieve some part of it, all while building a bridge to Anglicans (including Episcopalians) who have grown appalled at the fall of the Anglican Communion into unsalvagable heterodoxy.

He established the Ordinariate to include a reverent Mass, in English, of the Roman Rite, that also includes aspects of authentic Anglican patrimony. The result is a breath of fresh air: the accessibility of our English language with the reverence and tradition of the Extraordinary Form.

Regarding the lost English Catholic culture, most of the songs we sang were written by Anglican Protestants from the 17th through 19th centuries. One we sung lamented the “schisms and heresies” that wounded the Church. No doubt the original composer didn’t realize that his own Anglican community was in schism from the Church.'

The Feast of Saint Monica



O God, who console the sorrowful
and who mercifully accepted
the motherly tears of Saint Monica
for the conversion of her son Augustine,
grant us, through the intercession of them both,
that we may bitterly regret our sins
and find the grace of your pardon.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.


Saint Monica, pray for us, for all mothers and for young people.

Tuesday, 25 August 2015

The Feast of Saint Louis, King of France



O God, who brought Saint Louis from the cares of earthly rule to the glory of a heavenly realm, grant, we pray, through his intercession, that, by fulfilling our duties on earth, we may seek out your eternal Kingdom. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Saint Louis, pray for us and for all kings and queens.

Monday, 24 August 2015

The Feast of Saint Bartholomew



Strengthen in us, O Lord, the faith, by which the blessed Apostle Bartholomew clung wholeheartedly to your Son, and grant that through the help of his prayers your Church may become for all the nations the sacrament of salvation. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Saint Bartholomew, pray for us and for all missionaries.

Saturday, 22 August 2015

Flip Flop, by Caroline Knowles



Caroline Knowles, Flip Flop: A Journey through Globalisation's Backwaters, 2014 Pluto Press, London


A friend of mine from Zimbabwe told me that when he was a boy, he used to see people cutting old tyres into sandals. These days, very few Africans wear those homemade tyre sandals, as they can wear cheap flip flops imported from China.

Flip flops are the most commonly worn shoes on the planet. Millions of people wear no other shoes. They are the one of the most common and humble of global commodities. Yet where do they come from and how do they get to their millions of wearers? These are the questions asked by cultural anthropologist Caroline Knowles.

Knowles takes us on a journey with the flip flops. She begins in Kuwait, where the flip flops begin their life as oil. We then cross through Asia to South Korea, where she introduces us to factory workers who turn the oil into plastic, showing us how company life shapes the lives of these workers. We then look at how the flip flops get to the massive African markets and we learn about Somali piracy. Knowles introduces us to smugglers of contraband goods who evade the heavy import taxes levelled by the Ethiopian government. We are introduced to the shoe markets of Ethiopian and learn how the arrival of Chinese imports have altered it and the efforts of Ethiopians to replicate Chinese flip flop production. Knowles introduces us to a wearer of a batted flip flops, Finally, we see how flip flops meet their demise in the vast rubbish dumps of Ethiopia and we learn about the activities of rubbish scavengers.

This book if fascinating because it challenges the image that most people have of globalisation. People tend to think of globalisation in terms of a flow of resources and goods from south and east to the West, yet here we have a route of globalisation that bypasses the West entirely, going from Asia to Africa. Knowles demonstrates that globalisation is not simply about vast multi-national corporations, but it is also about individuals who are involved at all stages of the production, transport and sale of goods. In many ways, the process of globalisation empowers these individuals.



The Feast of the Cosmic Queenship of Our Lady



O God, who made the Mother of your Son to be our Mother and our Queen, graciously grant that, sustained by her intercession, we may attain in the heavenly Kingdom the glory promised to your children. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Hail, holy Queen, Mother of mercy; hail our life, our sweetness and our hope. To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we lift up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious Advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us. And after this our exile show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.


Litany of Loretto

Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.
Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.

God, the Father of Heaven, have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world, have mercy on us.
God the Holy Spirit, have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, One God, have mercy on us.

Holy Mary, pray for us.
Holy Mother of God, pray for us.
Holy Virgin of virgins, pray for us.
Mother of Christ, pray for us.
Mother of divine grace, pray for us.
Mother most pure, pray for us.
Mother most chaste, pray for us.
Mother inviolate, pray for us.
Mother undefiled, pray for us.
Mother most amiable, pray for us.
Mother most admirable, pray for us.
Mother of good counsel, pray for us.
Mother of our Creator, pray for us.
Mother of our Savior, pray for us.
Virgin most prudent, pray for us.
Virgin most venerable, pray for us.
Virgin most renowned, pray for us.
Virgin most powerful, pray for us.
Virgin most merciful, pray for us.
Virgin most faithful, pray for us.
Mirror of justice, pray for us.
Seat of wisdom, pray for us.
Cause of our joy, pray for us.
Spiritual vessel, pray for us.
Vessel of honor, pray for us.
Singular vessel of devotion, pray for us.
Mystical rose, pray for us.
Tower of David, pray for us.
Tower of ivory, pray for us.
House of gold, pray for us.
Ark of the covenant, pray for us.
Gate of heaven, pray for us.
Morning star, pray for us.
Health of the sick, pray for us.
Refuge of sinners, pray for us.
Comforter of the afflicted, pray for us.
Help of Christians, pray for us.
Queen of Angels, pray for us.
Queen of Patriarchs, pray for us.
Queen of Prophets, pray for us.
Queen of Apostles, pray for us.
Queen of Martyrs, pray for us.
Queen of Confessors, pray for us.
Queen of Virgins, pray for us.
Queen of all Saints, pray for us.
Queen conceived without original sin, pray for us.
Queen assumed into heaven, pray for us.
Queen of the most holy Rosary, pray for us.
Queen of Peace, pray for us.

Lamb of God, who take away the sins of the world, spare us, O Lord!.
Lamb of God, who take away the sins of the world, graciously hear us, O Lord!
Lamb of God, who take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.

V. Pray for us, O holy Mother of God.
R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray. Grant, we beg you, O Lord God, that we your servants, may enjoy lasting health of mind and body, and by the glorious intercession of the Blessed Mary, ever Virgin, be delivered from present sorrow and enter into the joy of eternal happiness. Through Christ our Lord.
R. Amen.



Holy Mary, Queen of the Universe, pray for us, that we may be counted worthy to reign with Christ.

Friday, 21 August 2015

The Feast of Pope Saint Pius X

O God, who to safeguard the Catholic faith and to restore all things in Christ, filled Pope Saint Pius the Tenth with heavenly wisdom and apostolic fortitude, graciously grant that, following his teaching and example, we may gain an eternal prize. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Glorious Pope of the Eucharist, Saint Pius X, you sought "to restore all things in Christ." Obtain for me a true love of Jesus so that I may live only for Him. Help me to acquire a lively fervor and a sincere will to strive for sanctity of life, and that I may avail myself of the riches of the Holy Eucharist in sacrifice and sacrament. By your love for Mary, mother and queen of all, inflame my heart with tender devotion to her.

Blessed model of the priesthood, obtain for us holy, dedicated priests, and increase vocations to the religious life. Dispel confusion and hatred and anxiety, and incline our hearts to peace and concord. so that all nations will place themselves under the sweet reign of Christ. Amen.

Saint Pius X, pray for me.


Saint Pius, pray for us and for Pope Francis.

Thursday, 20 August 2015

The Feast of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

O God, who made the Abbot Saint Bernard a man consumed with zeal for your house and a light shining and burning in your Church, grant, through his intercession, that we may be on fire with the same spirit and walk always as children of light. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Saint Bernard, pray for us and for all Cistercians.

Tuesday, 18 August 2015

The Feast of Saint Helena



O Lord Jesus Christ, who unto blessed Helena didst reveal the place where Thy Cross lay hid: thus choosing her as the means to enrich Thy Church with that precious treasure: do Thou, at her intercession, grant that by the price of the Tree of Life we may attain unto the rewards of everlasting life. Who livest and reignest.



Saint Helena, pray for us and for all Christian mothers.

Sunday, 16 August 2015

The Book of Common Prayer of 1549, 1559 and 1662



Brian Cummings (ed.), The Book of Common Prayer: The Texts of 1549, 1559 and 1662, 2011 Oxford University Press


This book collects the texts of the Book of Common Prayer editions of 1549, 1559 and 1662. One might have expected it to include Cranmer's second text of 1552 instead of the Elizabethan 1559, but the editor justifies this choice by pointing out that the 1552 was only used briefly before Mary's Catholic restoration, unlike the 1559 edition which was in use for a much longer period of time.

This is an extremely valuable resource for those interested in Anglican liturgy. Not only do we get these fundamental liturgical texts, but we also get an introduction detailing the history of the BCP and extensive notes on the texts. Surprisingly, there is a page marker, make it easier to refer to the notes or to make textual comparisons.

The reader will find that the offices of morning and evening prayer change very little, having the basic substance of the monastic liturgy. However, the rite of communion undergoes considerable evolution from a very Catholic service in 1549 to a much more Protestant rite. The development of the Litany from its origins in medieval devotional processions to a public state prayer is also fascinating.

The Feast of Saint Stephen of Hungary

Grant your Church, we pray, almighty God, that she may have Saint Stephen of Hungary, who fostered her growth while a king on earth, as her glorious defender in heaven. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Saint Stephen, pray for us and for Hungary.

Friday, 14 August 2015

The Feast of the Assumption of Our Lady



Almighty and everlasting God,
You have taken up body and soul
into the heavenly glory the Immaculate Virgin Mary,
Mother of Your Son: Grant, we beseech You,
that, ever intent upon heavenly things,
we may be worthy to be partakers of her glory.
Through Jesus Christ Your Son, our Lord,
who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit,
One God, forever and ever. Amen.


O Blessed Virgin Mary,
united to the victorious Christ in heaven,
you are the image and first-flowering of the Church
as she is to be perfected in the world to come.
You shine forth as a sign of sure hope and solace
for the pilgrim People of God.
In your Assumption,
you manifest the fullness of redemption
and appear as the spotless image of the Church
responding in joy
to the invitation of the Bridegroom, your Son,
who is the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep.

Grant that we may follow your example on earth
thereby imitating your Son as well
and being enabled to share your glory,
with Him for all eternity.


Holy Mary, Virgin Assumed into Heaven, pray for us, that we may enter into the glory and joy of heaven.

The Feast of Saint Maximillian Kolbe

O God, who filled the Priest and Martyr Saint Maximilian Kolbe with a burning love for the Immaculate Virgin Mary and with zeal for souls and love of neighbor, graciously grant, through his intercession, that striving for your glory by eagerly serving others, we may be conformed, even until death, to your Son. Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Saint Maximillian Kolbe, pray for us and for Poland.

Thursday, 13 August 2015

The Feast of Saint Tikhon of Zadonsk

Successor to the Apostles,
adornment of hierarchs, and teacher of the Orthodox Faith:
beseech the Master of all to grant peace to the universe
and to our souls great mercy.

From your youth you loved Christ, O blessed one.
You have been an example for all by word, life, love, faith, purity, and humility.
Therefore, you now abide in the heavenly mansions,
where you stand before the throne of the All-holy Trinity.
Holy Hierarch Tikhon, pray for the salvation of our souls


Saint Tikhon, pray for us and for Russia.

The Feast of Saint Maximus the Confessor

Champion of Orthodoxy, teacher of purity and of true worship,
Enlightener of the universe and adornment of hierarchs:
All-wise father Maximus, your teachings have gleamed with light upon all things.
Intercede before Christ God to save our souls.

Let us the faithful fittingly praise the lover of the Trinity,
The great Maximus who taught the God-inspired faith,
That Christ is to be glorified in His two natures, wills, and energies;
And let us cry to him: "Rejoice, herald of the faith."


Saint Maximus, pray for us and for theologians, that they may reject all heresies.

The Feast of Saint Pontian and Saint Hippolytus

I love the story of how Pontian, the rightful pope and Hippolytus, a schismatic anti-pope were rivals, yet the Romans had them both locked up together. Even in prison, they would not speak to each other, yet eventually were reconciled. Hippolytus is the only anti-pope to have been canonized. As a Protestant who was very anti-Catholic, yet reconciled to the Catholic Church, I can identify with him.

May the precious long-suffering of the just, O Lord, we pray, bring us a great increase of love for you and always prompt in our hearts constancy in the holy faith. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Saint Pontian and Saint Hippolytus, pray for us, that we would be reconciled with our brethren with whom we differ.

Tuesday, 11 August 2015

The Feast of Saint Philomena




O Saint Philomena, Virgin and Martyr, whom God glorifies by so many miracles, whom the Vicar of Jesus Christ has named the Protectress of The Living Rosary and the Children of Mary, manifest, more and more plainly from the heights of Heaven, that a voice holy as thine cannot be denied and that we have the right to rely upon thine aid. Obtain for us the grace to be faithful to Jesus Christ, even to death. Amen.


The Litany of Saint Philomena

Lord,have mercy on us.
Lord,have mercy on us.
Lord,have mercy on us. Christ hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.
God, the Father of Heaven,
have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
have mercy on us.
God the Holy Spirit,
have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, one God.
have mercy on us.
Holy Mary, Queen of Virgins
pray for us.
Saint Philomena,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, filled with abundant graces from your birth,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, faithful imitator of Mary,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, model of virginity,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, temple of perfect humility,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, inflamed with zeal for the glory of God,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, victim of love for Jesus,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, example of strength and perseverance,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, invincible champion of chastity,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, mirror of most heroic virtue,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, firm and intrepid in the face of torments,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, scourged like your Divine Spouse,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, pierced by a rain of arrows,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, consoled in chains by the Mother of God,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, miraculously healed in prison,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, comforted by the Angels in your torments,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, who preferred torments
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, who converted witnesses by your martyrdom,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, who wore out the fury of your tormentors,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, protectress of the innocent,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, patroness of youth,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, refuge of the unfortunate,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, health of the sick and infirmed,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, new light of the Church Militant,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, who confounds the impiety of the world,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, who rejuvenates the faith and courage of the faithful,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, whose name is glorious in Heaven and feared in Hell,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, made illustrious by the most splendid miracles,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, powerful with God,
pray for us.
Saint Philomena, who reigns in glory,
pray for us.
Lamb of God, You take away the sins of the world;
spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, You take away the sins of the world;
graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, You take away the sins of the world;
have mercy on us.
V. Pray for us, O Worker of Wonders, Saint Philomena,
R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.
Let us pray.
O Lord, through the intercession of Saint Philomena, Virgin and Martyr, whose eminent purity and practice of every virtue was most pleasing to you, pardon our sins and grant us the grace of___ (add your intention)



Saint Philomena, pray for us, for the Universal Living Rosary Association and for all Christian young people, that they may faithfully surrender their lives to Christ.



The Feast of Saint Clare of Assisi



O God, who in your mercy led Saint Clare to a love of poverty, grant, through her intercession, that, following Christ in poverty of spirit, we may merit to contemplate you one day in the heavenly Kingdom. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Saint Clare. pray for us and for all Franciscans.

Sunday, 9 August 2015

Deep Church Rising, by Andrew Walker and Robin Parry




Robin A. Parry and Andrew G. Walker, Deep Church Rising: Rediscovering the roots of Christian orthodoxy, 2014 SPCK

As I mentioned in my review of The Biblical Cosmos, I had the privilege of studying for Religious Studies A-Level Under Robin Parry many years ago. In this book, co-written with Andrew Walker, he urges the Christian church to recover the strength of its traditions in response to Modernity. This book brings back a memory from those days; in reference to Postmodernity, our authors quote the title of the Manic Street Preachers album 'This is my Truth, tell me yours.' Robin Parry borrowed my copy of that CD back in 1999. This title was a quotation by a Labour politician. I think Parry read it as a statement of relativism. I have never taken it that way; I have always thought it was about the truth of experience. We all have a truth that we can share with others.

I found myself getting weary of how long Parry and Walker spent talking about modern culture. I must have read dozens of books by intellectual evangelicals critiquing modernity and postmodernity in the past. I suspect young readers may feel that the authors come across as grumpy old men who just don't like the modern world. What is different here is Parry's willingness to acknowledge that the Protestant Reformation has contributed to the problems of modernity.

After Parry and Walker are finished painting the sorry picture of the modern world, the book gets more interesting. They defend the value of creeds, liturgy and the centrality of the sacraments in the life of the church. I have reservations with the handling of the subject of the Eucharist. They express unease with the Catholic doctrine of Transubstantiation. On the Protestant front, Parry criticises Evangelicals for opting for the Zwinglian view of the Eucharist and praises the Calvinist view. This is an issue he has had for a long time. I remember my parents coming home and telling me about one of his sermons on the subject of the Lord's Supper. They told me that he had explained that the Zwinglian view was wrong and the Calvinist view was right. I tried to explain why I held the Zwinglian view and rejected the Calvinist view, but I don't think they had come away understanding the difference between either view. It's easy to caricature Zwinglianism as a dead memorialism. When I was a Zwinglian evangelical, I challenged Parry on his presentation of the view on his blog. As a Catholic I now reject the Zwinglian view, but I think it is a more coherent view than the Calivnist view. The Calvinist view of the Eucharist suffers from a vagueness and I think Evangelicals are inclined to accept it out of a certain intellectual laziness. While Parry and Walker do not equate the Calvinist and the Eastern Orthodox view, they do seem to imply that it has a certain similarity. I think most Eastern Orthodox theologians would feel this is mislaeding. They would reject the Calvinist view as heresy and aargue for a view that is not substantially different to Transubstantiation.

I think there is some great material in this book, but there are some things I would have liked to have seen. I would have liked to have seen the authors engage a little more with the negative trends and to also think about what options Evangelicals have in terms of reconciling with ancient tradition. Should they try to incorporate more ancient features in their ecclesiological practices or should they be ready to consider the ancient church traditions? I would have also liked to have seen more on sexuality, which is probably the biggest challenge Christians are faced with today.

Biblical Evidence for Catholicism: New (?) Analogical Argument for Veneration of the ...


The Bible looks negatively on what it describes as "blasphemy" -- not just against God, but against holy persons or those set apart for His purposes (Moses: Acts 6:11; St. Paul: Acts 13:45; 18:6; saints in heaven: Rev 13:6; Christians in general: 1 Pet 4:4), and against angels (2 Pet 2:10; Jude 8; Rev 13:6). The same words for blasphemy are used for men, angels, and God.
This is because these men and angels serve as His messengers (2 Cor 8:23), direct representatives (Matt 10:40; Lk 10:16; Jn 13:20), ambassadors (2 Cor 5:20; Eph 6:20; Phlm 1:9), or witnesses (Jn 15:27; 19:35; 21:24; Acts 1:8; 2:32; 3:15; 10:39-41; 23:11; 1 Pet 5:1; Rev 1:2; 6:9). Indeed, Christians are even described as "fellow workers" with Him (1 Cor 3:9; 2 Cor 6:1; Phil 2:12-13). The Church is equated with Jesus Himself (both being persecuted in the same actions: Acts 26:11, 14-15), and there is also an identification of the Church "Body of Christ" with Christ Himself (1 Cor 12:27; Eph 1:22-23; 5:30; Col 1:24).

Saturday, 8 August 2015

Daily Telegraph: Donald Trump won't be the Republican candidate, but he will wreck the party's chances

Daily Telegraph: Donald Trump won't be the Republican candidate, but he will wreck the party's chances

Article by Dan Hodges

'Most significant was that we now know the identity of the next Republican nominee to be President of the United States. It will be Jeb Bush. It can only be Jeb Bush.
He was the only one of the candidates who bore even a passing resemblance to a serious politician. He was mature, measured, and successfully achieved his primary objective, which was to steer clear of the claws and fangs of his rivals.

Another thing we know – though we knew this already – is that Donald Trump is a lunatic. The man is a Grade A political suicide bomber. He confirmed this with his first answer, where he announced in his strangely bombastic but rambling way that if he didn’t secure the nomination he would consider running as an independent, thereby wrecking any hope of Republican victory.
Which is fine by me. And will probably be fine with the American people.'


I think Dan Hodges is absolutely correct. Jeb Bush is the man to run, but his chances of winning will be ruined by Trump et al dragging the debate to the lunatic Right. Jeb Bush will be forced to take an increasingly Rightist stance to appease the Trump brigade.

Naturalis Historia: The Dangers of Poor Scholarship: A Creationists’ Take on Feathered Dinosaurs

Naturalis Historia: The Dangers of Poor Scholarship: A Creationists’ Take on Feathered Dinosaurs

Every month seems to bring a report of a new fossil from the Jurassic or Cretaceous period rocks that display some form of feathers. This deluge of new fossil finds will not end soon as there are as many fossils under preparation for publication as there are already published. Just taking into account the fossils already revealed to the world it has become increasing evident that many types of dinosaurs had some form of feathers even if they were not covered by feathery plumage. Young earth creationists have reacted instinctively to each new fossil by attempting to neatly categorize them as either dinosaurs or birds but have found themselves at odds with each other about how to sort these fossils into separate “kinds.”

Those feathered Dinosaurs seem dreadfully interesting, but the Six-Day Creationists just can't stand them.




The Feast of Saint Gregory of Sinai

Thou didst reflect the angelic life,/ and thy soul was a vessel of vision./ O holy Father Gregory,/ thou radiant torch of virtues,/ the glory of Sinai and Athos/ and enlightener of the Slavonic lands,/ guide us unerringly, that our souls may be saved.


Saint Gregory of Sinai, pray for us and for Bulgaria.

The Feast of Saint Dominic




May Saint Dominic come to the help of your Church by his merits and teaching, O Lord, and may he, who was an outstanding preacher of your truth, be a devoted intercessor on our behalf. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Saint Dominic, pray for us and for all Dominicans.

The Metaphysics of Merlin: Angels mediate revelation

The Metaphysics of Merlin: Angels mediate revelation: This isn't intended to sum up the biblical position on angels or the bible, but it is interesting.  Hebrews 2:2 writes, For if the w...

Thursday, 6 August 2015

Throne, Altar, Liberty: The Tory and Democracy

Throne, Altar, Liberty: The Tory and Democracy


'The Tory, being a traditionalist and a royalist, does not share the liberal and leftist belief that democracy is the best form of government. That does not mean that the Tory rejects all forms of democracy. Democracy has a long pedigree, going back two and a half millennia, to ancient Athens. Democracy there was different from modern democracy. The assembly, which voted on all legislation, did not consist of elected representatives, but of the city’s adult, male, citizens, a form of direct democracy more practical in a city-state than in a larger polity. The greatest minds of democratic Athens did not consider it to be either ideal or the best possible form of government. Aristotle continued the discussion of constitutional forms that Plato had begun in The Republic and Laws in his The Constitution of Athens, Ethics, and Politics out of which discussion emerged the classic analysis of constitutions as falling into three basic forms – the rule of the one, the few, and the many – which can be either good or bad, depending upon whether those governing, rule for the common good of all, or merely for themselves. Neither Plato nor Aristotle though very highly of democracy, which, after all, was the system of government that had put Socrates to death and both used its name for the bad form of the rule of many. They saw these forms as unstable, creating a cycle in which one form goes bad, then is replaced by the next which goes bad in turn. Aristotle suggested, however, that a superior, stable, constitution might be possible by mixing all three in a single constitution.

Our parliamentary constitution of the United Kingdom and many Commonwealth countries such as Canada is an example of this kind of mixed constitution. Queen Elizabeth, presides over a parliament that consists of the House of Lords – or, here in Canada, the Senate – and the House of Commons, consisting of members elected by constituencies as their representatives. The Tory does not object to the democratic element of this mixture, the House of Commons. He insists, however, that the only true authority the House of Commons possesses, is to be regarded as being rooted in tradition and prescription, like that of the other two institutions, and not as being due to it being inherently more rational than the others, or deriving some greater legitimacy due to its being filled by popular election.'

The Feast of the Transfiguration




O God, who in the glorious Transfiguration of your Only Begotten Son confirmed the mysteries of faith by the witness of the Fathers and wonderfully prefigured our full adoption to sonship, grant, we pray, to your servants, that, listening to the voice of your beloved Son, we may merit to become co-heirs with him. Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


Lord Jesus, may our lives be transfigured, that we may come to share in thine eternal glory.

Wednesday, 5 August 2015

Benedictine Daily Prayer: A Short Breviary



Maxwell E. Johnson (ed.), Benedictine Daily Prayer: A Short Breviary, 2005 Liturgical Press


This is a one-volume version of the Benedictine Breviary. It is an attractive book, with a soft imitation leather cover. This is very much like a one-volume version of the Divine Office and can be used as such. Where it differs is in the presence of an order for nocturnal vigils and the division of daytime prayer into the traditional monastic hours of terce, sext and none. It also has a larger calendar of feast days than that of the Divine Office, including many saints of significance for Benedictines. It also has a specific Scripture reading for each day of the year, unlike most one-volume versions of the Liturgy.

It may take time to get used to saying this office, but it will not be difficult for Catholics with experience of saying the Liturgy of the Hours and it has plenty of page markers to make it easier to find where one needs to be.

I understand this breviary would not be sufficient to fulfill the obligations of a Benedictine Oblate, but it will be of interest to Catholics (and other Christians) wanting to appreciate monastic spirituality. It is also an excellent resource for saying the Church's Liturgy of the Hours.

Tuesday, 4 August 2015

Daily Telegraph: Jeremy Corbyn spoke to the masses, but I just saw a false prophet

Daily Telegraph: Jeremy Corbyn spoke to the masses, but I just saw a false prophet

Article by Dan Hodges


'It’s not just the vacuity of the vision. “Let’s build more homes, let’s train more nurses, lets give everyone a really good wage. Hoorah!!!”. No, let’s not. Let’s make everyone live in a tent, and employ lots of witch-doctors and introduce a system of barter.

Or the ritualistic name checking. The Tolpuddle Martyrs. The Chartists. The Suffragettes. The Miners. He’d stood with the miners in this very hall in 1984, apparently.

What genuinely amazed me was the staggeringly simplistic – at times almost childish – level of Corbyn’s analysis. So his policy of unilateralism was presented like this. “Does a nuclear explosion anywhere in the world bring about peace? I met the foreign minister of the Marshall Islands who as a child witnessed a nuclear test. He saw his islands and his country used as a bombing range for testing nuclear weapons, and they’re still paying the price. They’re paying the price with destruction. They’re paying the price with cancers”.
Nuclear weapons give you cancer. The geopolitical complexities of nuclear proliferation boiled down to a Daily Express headline.'

Sunday, 2 August 2015

The Experience of God, by David Bentley Hart



David Bentley Hart, The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness and Bliss, 2013 Yale University Press


I first heard of this book when I read the review in the Guardian (yeah, I really do read the Guardian). The Guardian does not praise a lot of Christian books, but the reviewer acknowledged that this book landed a significant blow against the atheist camp.

Classic theism has come under a lot of attack over the last century, from both liberals and conservatives. Orthodox scholar David Bentley Hart, however, not only affirms the classic theistic view of God, but also demonstrates the apologetic value of classic theism against atheism.

Hart argues that for the most part, atheists have largely misunderstood what kind of God Christians believe in. He points out that atheists frequently compare belief in God to belief in fairies or pagan deities like Zeus. Hart responds by arguing that the question of the existence of such entities is a quite different question. Zeus is one god among many gods, who might or might not exist. Fairies are simply a category of spiritual being. The question of the existence of Zeus or fairies is a purely local question and has no more cosmic significance than the existence or non-existence of the Loch Ness Monster. The God of major religions, on the other hand, is an entirely different category of being, in fact this God is being itself. God is not merely a thing that exists, but is existence itself, the ground on which other beings exist. Through existence, all beings participate in God and He holds them altogether. Thus, ahteists and theists have completely different understandings of the nature of reality.

When one understands this definition of God, one can answer the common claim of atheists that they do not need to disprove the existence of God, as one does not need to prove a negative. By claiming that there is no God, they are in effect making a positive proposition about reality, that is that it is a self-contained system.

I like Hart's diagnosis of the problem with the 'New Atheism':

"When it first arose, however, like any new creed, modern atheism had to win its converts from other adherences; and so its earliest apostles were persons who had for the most part been formed by a culture absolutely soaked in the language, images and sentiments of belief. All of them had at least some understanding not only of the nature of religious claims but of the pathos of faith. No matter how much the new convert may have hated his or her native religion a complete ignorance of its guiding ideas or of its affects and motives was all but impossible. And this remained the case until only fairly recently. Now, however, we have arrived at an odd juncture in our cultural history. There has sprung up a whole generation of confident, even strident atheist proselytizers who appear to know almost nothing about the religious beliefs they abominate, apart from a few vague and gauzily impressionistic daubs or aquarelle washes, and who seem to have no real sense of what the experience of faith is like or what its rationales might be. For the most part, they seem not event to know that they do not know."

Hart assists the atheist by providing a thorough exploration of not only what we mean when we talk about God, but also the whole dimensions of religious belief, going into the fields of consciousness, ethics and aesthetics. I think the apologetic of this book would work well with the approach of Reformed Epistemology, were it not for the fact that the adherents of Reformed Epistemology tend to reject the Classic Theism central to Hart's case for God.

One question in mind is raised by Hart's references to Hinduism and sometimes Buddhism. What difference does it make that Christians believe in a personal God while those religions do not?

I think this book makes a vital contribution to apologetics and is well worth reading.



The Feast of Saint Gamaliel

Yeah, you read the name right. According to tradition, one of the greatest ever rabbis in Judaism became a Christian, was baptized by St. Peter and is venerated by the Orthodox as a saint. Gamaliel, a Pharisee, was the tutor of St. Paul. He appears in Acts chapter five, where he argues for a tolerant approach to Christians.




O Almighty God, who willest to be glorified in thy Saints and didst raise up thy servant St. Gamaliel to shine as a light in the world: Shine, we pray thee, in our hearts, that we also in our generation may shew forth thy praises, who hast called us out of darkness into thy marvellous light; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Saint Gamaliel, pray for us and for the Jewish people.

The Feast of Our Lady, Queen of Angels




August Queen of Heaven!
Sovereign Mistress of the angels!
Thou who from the beginning
hast received from God
the power and mission to crush the head of Satan,
we humbly beseech thee
to send thy holy Legions,
that, under thy command
and by thy power,
they may pursue the evil spirits,
encounter them on every side,
resist their bold attacks
and drive them hence into the abyss of eternal woe.

Amen


Our Lady, Queen of Angels, pray for us, that we may be granted the privilege of reigning with Christ over the cosmic powers.

Saturday, 1 August 2015

St. Alphonsus Liguori vs. St. Louis De Montfort

I read St. Alphonsus Liguori's great book The Glories of Mary about a year ago. I found it very encouraging. It was fantastic to read about the power of Mary's intercessions on behalf of sinners. Some months later, I read that other great Marian work, True Devotion to Mary, by St. Louis De Montfort. Unfortunately, I did not find this book nearly so encouraging.

St. Louis De Montfort gives the impression that our devotion to Mary is useless unless it is perfectly motivated and springs from selfless adoration and love. One could easily feel reading his book that we can never be good enough for our Blessed Mother. In contrast, St. Alphonsus Liguori tells us that even the smallest devotions to Mary, like carrying a rosary or saying an Hail Mary once a day are enough to draw the mercy of the Blessed Virgin. By making small steps towards her, she will draw close to us. There is a much stronger sense of grace in The Glories of Mary.

I am sure these two holy men would not disagree in reality. Their two books are written for different purposes. There is a definite sense though, that True Devotion is about what we do for Mary, while The Glories of Mary is about what Mary does for us.

Read both books, but I would urge you to read The Glories of Mary before you read True Devotion to Mary.

Helm's Deep: Christian Theism and the Particular Baptists

Helm's Deep: Christian Theism and the Particular Baptists

And closely connected with God’s simplicity and his atemporality is his aseity. ‘Aseity’, independence, is an unfamiliar word, yet the idea behind it is a vital one. It is the root idea behind the affirmation of the underivedness of God,, that God is a se, from himself. This does not mean that God has created himself, he is uncreated. This idea of aseity has a strong element of negativity to it, as all the expressions we are considering have. So aseity does not mean that God has made himself, that would be incoherent, but that the child’s question ‘God made me, but who made God?’ rests upon a misunderstanding. In learning the grammar of his faith, the child has slipped up, misspoken. But the mistake is easily corrected. How could anything or anyone have made God, for he is the Creator of everything except himself? He is uncreated. It makes no sense to say that God was made, for to do so once again confounds the Creator-creature distinction. It is a mistake in the grammar of our language of God. The Creator-creature distinction is fundamental to all Christian theology; we must never lose sight of it.

The interconnectedness of the simplicity, the timelessness, the immutability and the aseity of God, (and of God’s full activity) lies at the heart of Christian theism. It is important to stress that this connectedness is not only a work of human reason, but that it is first and foremost grounded in God himself, and made known in Holy Scripture. We noted this about immutability, and it is so with eternality and aseity and the rest. We may make distinctions in our thought of God, as when we say that God is three persons. But such distinctions are not divisions in the reality of God.


The Litany of Saint Alphonsus Liguori, Doctor of the Church

For private use only

Lord have mercy on us.
Christ have mercy on us.
Lord have mercy on us. Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.
God, the Father of Heaven,
have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
have mercy on us.
God the Holy Ghost,
have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, One God,
have mercy on us.

Holy Mary, Virgin Immaculate,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, model of piety from tenderest youth,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, scourge of heresies,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, defender of the Catholic Faith,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, always occupied in evangelizing the poor,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, tender comforter of the afflicted,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, instructed in the Divine art of
converting sinners,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, enlightened guide in the path of perfection,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, who became all things to all men,
to gain all for Christ,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, new ornament of the Religious state,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, bold champion of ecclesiastical discipline,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, model of submission and devotion
to the Sovereign Pontiff,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, who didst watch unceasingly over the
flock committed to thee,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, full of solicitude for the common good
of the Church,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, glory of the Priesthood and
of the Episcopate,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, shining mirror of all virtues,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, full of tenderest love for the infant Jesus,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, inflamed with Divine love whilst offering
the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, fervent adorer of Jesus Christ
in the Holy Eucharist,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, penetrated with lively compassion while
meditating on the sufferings of our Divine Savior,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, specially devoted to the
Blessed Virgin Mary,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, favored by apparitions
of the Mother of God,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, leading an angelic life,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, a true Patriarch in thy paternal
solicitude for the people of God,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, endowed with the gift of prophecy
and miracles,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, an Apostle by the extent and fruit of thy labors,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, a Martyr by thy austerities,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, a Confessor by thy writings full
of the Spirit of God,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, a Virgin by thy purity of soul and body,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, a model of Missionaries,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, founder of the Order of the Most
Holy Redeemer,
pray for us.
St. Alphonsus, our tender father and powerful protector,
pray for us.

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Have mercy on us.

V. Pray for us, St. Alphonsus,
R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray.

O God, Who by the Blessed Alphonsus Maria, Thy Confessor and Bishop, inflamed with zeal for souls, has enriched Thy Church with a new progeny: we beseech Thee, that taught by his saving counsels, and strengthened by his example, we may happily come to Thee. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.