Saturday, 31 January 2015

Angry Christians



I used to travel in fairly fundamentalist Protestant circles and came across a lot of angry Christians. They seemed to be angry all the time. They were angry with the Catholic church, angry with ecumenicism, angry with Islam, angry with liberalism, angry with modern Bible versions, angry about modern worship styles and angry about the charismatic movement. They were angry with the media, angry with the government. They were angry about the European Union and usually angry about immigration. They were angry about homosexuality and angry about the way young women dress. If they were Calvinists, they were angry with Arminians and Dispensationalists, if they were Dispensationalists, they were angry with Calvinists and Amillennialists. They seemed to be angry with everything in the modern world.

Now I have moved to Roman Catholicism, I still seem too encounter angry Christians. These Catholics are angry with the Novus Ordo, angry with liberal Catholics, angry about altar girls and angry about guitars. Just like their Protestant counterparts they are angry about homosexuality, angry with Islam, angry about the way young women dress, angry with the government and angry with the media. I don't know why, but some of them are angry with the European Union and angry about immigration too. Most of all, they are angry with Pope Francis, Walter Kasper and the rest of their crew.

Plenty of Eastern Orthodox seem to be angry too. Their anger seems to be directed most often towards Islam and western society in general. They also get angry with Protestants, angry with the Catholic church and angry with Orthodox from jurisdictions other than their own.


I get really frustrated by these angry Christians and I worry about their spiritual condition. In all that anger, where is the joy of knowing Christ? Where is the peace and faith that God is working out His purposes? Where is the hope of Christ's coming? Sometimes it is right to be angry, but let's not let anger keep us from the joy of being in Christ.

10 comments:

  1. Perhaps it is a general problem of taking on an identity that one develops a dislike or anger for all that have chosen other identities. If so, anger with the other is probably pretty close to universal. It is unpleasant, but, if it is universal, one probably needs a coping strategy. What is yours? (Aside from recognizing it as a mistake and problem.)

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    1. Mu coping strategy is knowing that my hope is in Christ.

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    2. How does that work? How does it change your attitude or the attitudes of those for whom you are concerned?

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  2. Knowing my hope is in Christ fills me with joy and keeps me from feeling angry all the time.

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    1. That is excellent news. I am very happy for you.

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    2. My worry is that those Christians who are constantly expressing anger about religious and political issues don't have that experience.

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    3. I would agree that the people that you mention are in some danger. Perhaps a discrete sharing of your experience and thought would help them---anger can be a bad habit, and having it brought to one's attention can help one to break the habit. However, a direct and public confrontation can be counter productive if they get their back up. I should also mention that I am not religious, but this issue is common to many people in many circles. In your circle, I think your experience could be helpful for your coreligionists.

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    4. Thanks for sharing your thoughts

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